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Pituitary Disorders Care and Treatment

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With just the right balance of patient care, research and education, University of Colorado Hospital provides the highest quality treatment for pituitary disorders in the nation.

What are pituitary disorders?

At University of Colorado Hospital, specialists in endocrinology, neurosurgery, radiology, neuropathology and radiation oncology team up to bring a true multidisciplinary approach to treating the following pituitary disorders:

  • Pituitary tumors (see below)
  • Prolactinomas
  • Cushing's Syndrome
  • Acromegaly
  • Craniopharygiomas
  • Rathke cleft cysts
  • Pituitary hormone deficiencies

Pituitary Tumors

Why Choose Treatment for Pituitary Tumors at University of Colorado Hospital?

With just the right balance of patient care, research and education, University of Colorado Hospital provides the highest quality treatment for pituitary tumors in the nation.

 

What is a Pituitary Tumor?

A pituitary tumor is a tumor located on your pituitary gland, which connects to the brain and is located just behind the eyes. The pituitary gland secretes hormones into the blood stream that stimulate reproductive organs (ovaries and testes), growth in children and adolescents, and milk production in pregnant and nursing women.

 

Pituitary tumors are slow growing tumors that are rarely malignant (cancerous). However, they can cause other problems. Depending on the size and location, they can cause hormone problems with hormone levels, headaches, blurred vision, excessive urination and thirst.

 

Pituitary tumors can be treated with medication and surgery if necessary.

 

Patient Education

Living With Pituitary Disorders

Pituitary disorders can affect the body and metabolism in many ways:

 

Pituitary tumors. Often a pituitary tumor will produce excess hormones. Depending on which hormones are being secreted, pituitary tumors can cause hypothyroidism, Cushing's Syndrome, excess abdominal fat, depression, weakness, excessive bone growth, sudden lactation (milk production) and loss of menstrual periods.

 

Often a tumor that is causing hormone imbalances responds well to either oral or injected medication. When medication is ineffective or the tumor is very large, the tumor may need to be removed surgically by a neurosurgeon.

 

Pituitary Disorders: Getting a Second Opinion

University of Colorado Hospital's pituitary specialists are happy to offer a second opinion and to work with you if you choose to come to our hospital for treatment.

 

Additional Pituitary Disorder Resources

Pituitary Network Association